Failure to Identify

Under Texas law,

  1. a person commits an offense of Failure to Identify if he intentionally refuses to give his name, residence address, or date of birth to a peace officer who has lawfully arrested the person and requested the information.
  2. a person commits an offense if he intentionally gives a false or fictitious name, residence address, or date of birth to a peace officer who has:
    • 1) lawfully arrested the person;
    • 2) lawfully detained the person; or
    • 3) requested the information from a person that the peace officer has good cause to believe is a witness to a criminal offense.

Penalties

Generally, a charge of Failure to Identify is a Class C Misdemeanor, and thus punishable by a fine of up to $500.

* If it is shown on the trial of an offense under this section that the defendant was a fugitive from justice at the time of the offense, the offense is:

  1. a Class B Misdemeanor if the offense is committed under subsection (a); or
  2. a Class A Misdemeanor if the offense is committed under subsection (b).

Failure to IdentifyContact Us Today

At Ross Law Offices, we offer a free consultation to discuss your case and go over every option you may have. A qualified criminal defense attorney will often be able to keep this charge from appearing on your permanent record, and thus affecting the rest of your life. Don’t hesitate. Call us today.

940-230-2400